10 Best HGH Supplements

10 Best HGH Supplements

A top 10 list should provide you with useful information that answers the question you seek. To that end, our 10 best HGH supplements provide you with options that may help you boost HGH production. Now, you will notice that we emphasized the word “may.” The reason is that not every supplement will work for every person. Also, once you have growth hormone deficiency, you may need more than an over-the-counter supplement to increase your HGH levels.

You will also notice what is missing from this list – big-ticket brand-name supplements that promise results they cannot prove. Here is the real deal – most OTC HGH supplements do not work. People who get results from them are likely:

  • engaging in healthy dietary habits
  • working out
  • getting enough sleep
  • taking other substances that contribute to their results

Most growth hormone supplements on the market have little to no research. The ones that do provide facts to back up their statements only tell you in small print that they sponsored the studies. We have learned not to trust self-funded statements after big-sugar lied to us about fats being the cause of all our health problems. It really is sugar, folks. Eliminate sugar from your diet, and you will likely get a boost in HGH and testosterone production.

The majority of HGH boosters for sale today are nothing more than a pitch to get your money. A true supplement directly provides the body with additional HGH. That can only be found with prescription human growth hormone injections. A booster, on the other hand, helps to promote natural HGH secretion. You cannot consume HGH orally or rub it on your skin. HGH would be rendered useless by the body’s digestive system and liver. Also, the HGH molecule is too large to pass through the skin or other membranes.

On that note, here are the 10 best HGH supplements (HGH boosters) that we feel confident in recommending:

  • Alpha GPC
  • Arginine (L-arginine)
  • GABA (Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid)
  • Glutamine (L-glutamine)
  • Glycine (L-glycine)
  • L-Dopa
  • Lysine (L-lysine)
  • L-Valine
  • L-Ornithine
  • Sermorelin

The Top 10 HGH Supplements – How and Why They Work

A good HGH supplement will help promote natural growth hormone secretion by the pituitary gland. It may do this in one of two ways: stimulating production or inhibiting other hormones that block secretion.

Some HGH supplements work well when taken before bedtime. Others support HGH production either before or after exercise. Knowing when to take the supplements that aid human growth hormone secretion is as important as understanding how they work.

Here is your in-depth, alphabetical look at how and why the 10 best HGH supplements work:

Alpha GPC (Alpha-glycerophosphocholine)

Although it is still early in the research, Alpha GPC appears to stimulate HGH spikes when taken in large doses before workouts. Alpha GPC boosts bio-available choline which aids neuron acetylcholine synthesis. Increased choline levels in plasma stimulate growth hormone secretion via catecholamine release. Try using 600 to 1,200 mg before exercising to boost HGH release.

Arginine (L-arginine)

As a non-essential amino acid, arginine is created by the body. That means it does not have to be added into one’s diet. However, a body low in arginine may also be HGH deficient. The pituitary gland, home to HGH and other hormones, also produces arginine which then blocks the effects of somatostatin. Also known as growth hormone inhibiting hormone, somatostatin impedes HGH production.

When you take arginine on an empty stomach, you can help boost HGH secretion. Arginine also supports nitric oxide creation, immune functions, and circulation. It can also aid in the repair of blood vessels and fighting inflammation. Arginine is also beneficial when taken before a short weight-training session.

GABA (Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid)

The impact of GABA on reducing stress and calming the central nervous system helps to lower cortisol levels which inhibits HGH production. GABA can increase human growth hormone release during both exercise and rest periods. In one study, participants saw an approximate 400% increase in HGH levels when taken at rest. After exercise, GABA can boost HGH by as much as 200%.

Glutamine (L-glutamine)

Glutamine helps to stimulate the pituitary gland to boost HGH secretion. In one study, subjects received two grams of glutamine mixed in a cola beverage. Glutamine helped increase circulating HGH levels ninety minutes after administration. Another benefit of glutamine is its ability to improve protein synthesis, cellular energy, and wound and burn healing.

Glycine (L-glycine)

The amino acid glycine helps form collagen and gelatin, and is essential for numerous metabolic, cognitive, and muscle functions. Glycine assists in the production of HGH and can improve flexibility and decrease joint pain. Another benefit of glycine is its ability to slow aging and strengthen the immune system. Since glycine also supports the central nervous system and improves sleep, it makes it possible for more HGH release to occur overnight.

L-Dopa

L-Dopa is the precursor to dopamine – a neurotransmitter that helps to increase growth hormone levels. An added benefit of L-Dopa use is its testosterone boosting effects via increased luteinizing hormone production. L-Dopa stimulation of HGH may last as long as two hours following administration with onset after sixty minutes.

Lysine (L-Lysine)

L-lysine works best when used in conjunction with L-arginine to boost HGH production. A combination of 1.2 g of lysine and 1.2 mg of arginine increased HGH levels within 30 minutes. The peak increase was seen after 90 minutes. The concentration of human growth hormone was elevated up to eight times higher than at basal levels. Lysine itself will not boost HGH production – it must be used in conjunction with arginine.

L-Valine

L-valine is an essential amino acid that is one of the three BCAAs (branched chain amino acids). L-valine is not produced in the body, so you can only get it from food or through supplementation. Take L-valine in conjunction with the other two BCAAs – L-leucine and L-isoleucine to help boost HGH production.

Ornithine (L-ornithine)

Ornithine helps to reduce the stress on the liver while decreasing the presence of ammonia and other waste elements in the bloodstream. Since ornithine works in the liver, it also aids in the stimulation of insulin growth factor 1 which HGH promotes. Later, it helps IGF-1 stimulate the hypothalamus to increase HGH production.

When taken before bed, ornithine helps improve human growth hormone release. You can also take ornithine before a workout to increase IGF-1 secretion.

Sermorelin

There is no better HGH booster than sermorelin. The difference between sermorelin and all the other supplements listed here is that sermorelin is only available by prescription. Sermorelin is an injectable medication that directly stimulates HGH production in the pituitary gland. It is called a secretagogue for its powerful effect on human growth hormone secretion.

Although sermorelin is the best HGH supplement you can buy, even that will not work effectively for people with very low HGH levels. Once you have widespread symptoms of growth hormone deficiency, you will likely need HGH therapy at first to reverse your symptoms.

It is always best to speak with a hormone specialist to find out through blood analysis what will work best to boost your HGH levels. Please contact our hormone clinic for your no-cost, no-obligation, confidential consultation.

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